PathBridge Financial Newsletter – October 1st Edition

Portugal

The Path Ahead

Plan Wisely | Retire Well | Travel on Your Terms


In this issue…
  • One of the most important things you can do for the health of your retirement portfolio is rebalance now
  • Win the ex-pat life for a month in Portugal (pictured above), expenses paid – here’s how to apply
  • 10 life-changing world tours to add to your bucket list
  • Who wins? Chase Ultimate Rewards Vs. American Express Membership Rewards

…and more!

If you’re in Pittsburgh, I highly recommend a trip up to McConnell’s Mill State Park. Get there early and you’ll have the place almost to yourself. I shot this video last fall. 


Fall is one of my favorite seasons as I enjoy weather where I can wear a henley without a coat, leaves start to change color, and I have an excuse to make chili – often. Here at PathBridge Financial, I am doing reviews with all ongoing financial planning clients and rebalancing portfolios. Not a client? It’s still a good time to review your goals, asset allocation, and financial progress over the last year.

International travel has been put on hold for me, but I enjoy hearing travel stories from clients who are a bit more adventurous than myself. However, all is not lost as I have a Louisville, KY trip planned, which includes a day on the infamous bourbon trail. The perfect fall activity.

I also will do my best to hit McConnell’s Mill State Park to catch some quality foliage. For everyone that lives in Pittsburgh, the park is about an hour north of the city. It’s a fantastic place to hike year-round, but it is elevated to another level of spectacular in the fall. Take a look at the video I shot last year above. You hike through a forest alongside a rapidly running stream while navigating huge rocks that look unworldly as multi-colored leaves rain down. There’s also a red, covered bridge you can drive/walk through that belongs on a postcard. I highly recommend the trip, and if you get there before 9-10 am, you’ll have the place mostly to yourself.

Safe Travels,
David


Travel

I’m sharing this next link under one condition. If you win, I’m coming to visit! International Living is looking for one lucky winner (or couple) to test out the ex-pat life in Portugal for a month. They will fly you there, pay for your accommodations, and give you “a generous expenses allowance.” The catch? You have to report back about your experience. It appears that much of your reporting back will involve some short videos. If you’re a natural in front of the camera and looking for an adventure, here’s the link. Good luck!

Some of the exotic, “life-changing” trips featured in this article from Travel Curator: Around the World in 80 Days, Flavors of the World, and Wildlife of the World. There’s something for everyone in this eclectic list that will certainly stir your wanderlust and have you dreaming about what could be.

I often find myself recommending one of the Chase Sapphire cards to clients, but this article is a reminder that one size doesn’t fit all.  Chase Ultimate Rewards vs. AmEx Membership Rewards – the winner? It depends.


Retirement

Here is a fantastic article from Morningstar on the importance of rebalancing your portfolio. It was written in March of 2020 when global pandemic fear was high among investors and stocks were trading near their lows. The timing was exceptional, and investors that followed the article’s advice were well-rewarded as they increased stock positions and then watched stock markets around the world rebound strongly.

I will soon begin rebalancing portfolios for all ongoing clients, and doing it now may be just as important as it was in March of 2020. The dramatic returns of the U.S. stock market over the last year and a half have created overweight positions in equities, especially in U.S. large-cap technology stocks. When meeting with new clients, I repeatedly see portfolios dangerously overweight with large-cap technology holdings. Never forget – the market often drops much more quickly than it goes up, so now is not the time to disregard your desired asset allocation and risk tolerances. Now is the time to rebalance and diversify. 


Did you miss the last issue of The Path Ahead? If so, you have a second chance to catch up on:

  • The best fall foliage map I could find

  • The types of investments you should put in each account

  • 21 new direct flights from Pittsburgh

  • How to reduce your taxes by superfunding a 529 plan


Prefer to receive my newsletter in your inbox?

You’ll not only be signed up for my newsletter which is published twice a month, but you’ll also get a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for people who love to travel is all about. Thanks for reading!

 

 
 
  • *Privacy policy: your email address is safe, and you will never receive SPAM.


    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

     

     

    Welcome to the new PathBridge Financial Newsletter!

    The Path Ahead

    Plan Wisely | Retire Well | Travel on Your Terms


    In this issue…
    • The best fall foliage map I could find
    • The types of investments you should put in each account
    • 21 new direct flights from Pittsburgh
    • How to reduce your taxes by superfunding a 529 plan

    …and more!

    Mont-Saint-Michel – designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1979. This French, part-time island is equal parts medieval fortress, architectural oddity, and natural wonder. I’ve been intrigued for decades, and hopefully, I’ll be here next spring if all goes well.


    And finally…

    …welcome to the long-delayed PathBridge Financial newsletter. Titled – The Path Ahead!

    I know what you’re thinking – “Why should I care?”

    My goal is a twice-a-month newsletter that is equal parts entertaining and informative. I’ll cover travel, retirement, investing, personal finance, and news about me and the firm. The newsletter will contain original content and I’ll share the best books, articles, videos, podcasts, and more that I come across. 

    Please let me know if there’s anything you like, dislike, or want to see in the future. All feedback is appreciated. Thank you for your time.

    David


    Travel

    Parts of the country are already entering peak foliage season. Here’s a link to the best map I’ve found on the internet. It allows you to change the date to see when peak season will be near you.

    COVID sucks, but – “The pandemic did not quench the thirst for air travel.” New, direct flights were added nationwide as airlines moved away (at least temporarily) from their hub-and-spoke system. Pittsburgh added 21 new routes, and this map shows you each one. I hope this is a change that has staying power.

    I always take notice when another financial advisor talks about travel, especially when it’s one as respected as Benjamin Brandt. His podcast – Retirement Starts Today Radio – has a new episode out on Bucket Lists. It covers how to budget for a trip and how to focus on experiences you value. The podcast is a breezy 25 minutes. 


    Retirement

    When it comes to funding a 529 Plan to save on taxes, go big and go early! There is an option to superfund 529 plans where a couple can deposit up to $150,000 at one time. Do this early on and you’ll have many years of tax-free growth. Another benefit is certain states don’t tax contributions. For example, Pennsylvanians will avoid the 3.07% state tax. Here’s a brief overview. 

    One of the most common questions I get from clients is –  “What type of investments should go into my different retirement accounts?” Determining what type of account should hold different asset classes is a balancing act between tax efficiency, expected return, and holding period. Below is the asset location “Smile” as created by Michael Kitces. And here is an in-depth article on everything you need to think about when making this critical decision.   


    Prefer to receive my newsletter in your inbox?

    You’ll not only be signed up for my newsletter which is published twice a month, but you’ll also get a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for people who love to travel is all about. Thanks for reading!

     

     
     
  • *Privacy policy: your email address is safe, and you will never receive SPAM.


    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

     

     

    Adios 2020 – 5 Lessons, Best Travel Photos of the Year, and a Rollercoaster on a Cruise Ship? – Links

    Path bridge snow

    It’s the end of 2020, not what I was expecting when I rang in the New Year. My way of life changed dramatically for the worst in some ways, as traveling came to a halt and I grew a terrible beard. However, financially I’ve never looked better as the stock market soared and my spending dropped drastically. (It’s amazing how good your budget can look when you don’t go anywhere.) Unchanged, was my business, which didn’t miss a beat as I can work from anywhere with little adjustment. I realize this isn’t possible for everyone, and I feel very fortunate. Lastly, and most importantly, my health and that of my family is good.

    I’d prefer 2021 to be a bit more festive. I’m looking forward to some second-half of the year travel assuming vaccines go as planned. I have some canceled vacations I’d like to bring back to life and some family members I’d like to hug. That’s enough of my rambling…

    I hope everyone has a very happy New Year! 


    Retirement

    If you’re not following me on LinkedIn, now’s your chance! I’ve put together some new content and my intentions are to post daily (if I can keep it up) about planning for retirement and travel. I’ll attempt some humor along the way to try and keep it from being stuffy and just another financial planning lecture. Here’s my profile where you can connect. 

    5 Things We Learned About Retirement Planning and Travel in 2020 – (PBF)

    The old saying goes – “No sailor learned anything in calm seas.” Given 2020 was the equivalent of a hurricane, here are the most important lessons of the year.


    Travel

    Comprehensive article on how 2021 might look in terms of travel – (NY Times)

    The article goes in-depth into international travel, spending time on a cruise ship, traveling with children, business trips, and more. It will make you think about all the possible issues that might arise. It’s much more complex than get a vaccine – jump on a plane to Europe.

    Best travel photos of 2020 – (Worlds Nomads)

    Dreaming of travel in 2021? These travel photos of 2020 will get you in the right frame of mind.

    The newest cruise ship from Carnival – (Bloomberg)

    It may be a while, but at 1.5 times the size of Carnival’s next largest ship, it will be worth the wait. My guess is the Mardi Gras will be filled and collecting premium prices from cruisers within a year or two. Honestly, how do you pass up the chance to ride a roller coaster on the top of a cruise ship?


    Your questions about planning for retirement and travel answered. Where to go? What to do? How to plan it? How to afford it?

    You’ll not only be signed up for my newsletter, but you’ll also get a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for people who love to travel is all about. Thanks for reading!

     

     
     
  • *Privacy policy: your email address is safe, and you will never receive SPAM.

     

    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    5 Things We Learned About Retirement Planning and Travel in 2020

    A Shopping Cart filled with toilet paper

    2020 is almost over. It seems like a bigger than normal celebration is in order, but ironically, the usual New Year’s festivities will be muted. Lockdown orders and an unwillingness to gather in crowds will do that.

    You can’t live through such a unique year without learning something. Maybe it was how to make a mask with an old t-shirt and duct tape, or perhaps it was how to time deliveries at your local supermarket so you could hoard Clorox Wipes.

    What have I learned? I’m glad you asked.

    Do it now

    “The future is promised to no one.”

    A great quote that either came from the Bible, Clint Eastwood, or Walter Payton – Google seems confused. Regardless, 2020 reinforced this concept with the subtlety of a tire iron to the knee.

    Globally there have been 1.6 million poor souls that have died from COVID-19 – a tragic number that continues to climb and a stark reminder that tomorrow is not guaranteed.

    So, do it now. Whatever you’ve been putting off, do it now. Of course, now doesn’t necessarily mean this instant. Do it as soon as it’s reasonably safe. Time with loved ones, long-delayed retirement planning, bucket-list travel – whatever you’ve been putting off. If it’s important to you, 2020 should be that gentle forceful push to get you moving.

    A large elephant nudges a baby elephant from behind

    Don’t try to time the market

    Sure, it’s easy. Sell high and buy low.

    When you’re unemotionally scanning a long-term chart of the S&P 500 in your pajamas, with hot cocoa by your side, the 2020 market drop seems like a tiny blip. Living through it was quite different. With a pandemic raging in the world and global stock markets plunging, opening a newspaper (or news website of your choice) delivered headlines like this:

    Coronavirus Rescue Package Fails to Clear Hurdle in Senate

    IOC Considers Postponing Tokyo Olympic Games

    Coronavirus Hits U.S. Senate as Rand Paul Tests Positive

    Marriott, Hotel Owners Furlough Thousands of Workers, Cut Staff

    And my favorite :

    The Great Toilet Paper Scare

    These articles appeared in the March 22nd edition of The Wall Street Journal – the day before the S&P 500 bottomed.

    Successfully timing the 2020 market involved two trades – selling before the most rapid bear market in history and buying before the fastest recovery. I’m sure everyone has an uncle who brags about how they nailed it to the day, but for most, coming out ahead navigating this market was extremely difficult.

    How hard is market timing? The September 2007 article “Mutual Fund Flows and Investor Returns: An Empirical Examination of Fund Investor Timing Ability” measured mutual fund investors’ performance from 1991-2004. Investor timing decisions caused them to average returns that were 1.56% lower each year than they could have been. Compounded over a lifetime, this is a crippling blow to an investor’s net worth.

    There is undoubtedly an investment guru who sidestepped the crash nimbly and then bought aggressively at the bottom. You’ll hear all about their genius. Don’t be impressed until they do it a second time.

    The best course of action? Keep diligently adding to your retirement accounts. You’ll buy more at lower prices, and your nest egg will thank you. Buy and hold investing works.

    The emergency fund became sexy

    For most people, the emergency fund is boring. It’s a pile of cash in a high-yielding account (try to control your laughter, these used to exist) that sits there unloved. That’s until a once-in-a-generation pandemic sweeps the globe and leaves financial destruction in its wake.

    Financial planning 101 – save 3-6 months of expenses for a rainy day. And every so often, a torrential downpour like 2020 comes along to make you happy you did. 

    Woman stands in pouring rain with umbrella

    If you made it through the year with your job, you were one of the lucky ones. Nearly 16 million Americans were not so fortunate.

    I’ve written many times that the emergency fund is not sexy, but it’s critical when you need it. It can reduce stress and give you extra time to weigh your options when an emergency strikes.

    Retirement may come earlier than you think

    “First time in nearly 50 years people 55 and over have lost jobs at a higher rate than younger peers” – AARP

    Unemployment has hit older workers hard during a time in their lives traditionally used to shore up retirement savings. These high-income years, paired with the ability to make catch-up contributions, are often instrumental to the financial success of a retirement plan.

    Whether it’s companies trying to cull well-compensated employees, or other forms of ageism, this development is unsettling. It may become the normal course of action when future economic shocks hit the economy.

    Even in good times, older workers often leave the workplace earlier than planned. Issues such as health or caring for loved ones can cut short a career.

    The pandemic is a harsh reminder that plans don’t always go as expected.

    The best way to prepare for the unexpected is to develop a retirement plan early and fund it aggressively. If you’d like to retire the day you reach 65, put together a plan that shaves a few years off that number. It’s better to save as if you’re going to retire a few years sooner than desired because early retirement may come whether you want it to or not.

    Another benefit of conservatively preparing for a premature exit is your employer may offer an early retirement package. You will be in a better position to accept an attractive offer. Also, early retirement packages can precede layoffs, so it’s nice to have options.

    Prepare for the future

    A good plan is most valuable when the world around you is falling apart. How did 2020 treat your plan?

    If it’s important to you, plan for it. Put together a budget for expenses, review your insurance policies, make sure your beneficiaries are up to date, and your will remains true to your wishes. It’s too late to come up with a well-conceived plan when you’re in the middle of a crisis.

    If you love to travel, now’s the time to plan your future adventures. Figure out where you want to go, what you want to do, and when you want to do it. Sure, you’ve always had the dream of an African safari sometime later in life, but now’s the time to put a date on it.

    Safari at Sunset

    If you’re not doing it already, include travel in your retirement budget. Most people want to travel when they are done working, but most don’t budget for it. (Financial advisor hint: It can be expensive.)

    Not to make this into a commercial, but now’s the time to put together a comprehensive financial plan. If you have the time, knowledge, and desire to do it yourself, I highly encourage you to go for it. If you need help, find a fee-only financial advisor who will help you with it.

    Conclusion

    The pandemic we are living through is miserable in so many ways. However, the worst thing to do is not learn from it. The last nine months have been a painful time for many, but the experience may ultimately help us all make better decisions and lead a more rewarding life.


    Your questions about planning for retirement and travel answered. Where to go? What to do? How to plan it? How to afford it?

    You’ll not only be signed up for my newsletter, but you’ll also get a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for people who love to travel is all about. Thanks for reading!

     

     
     
  • *Privacy policy: your email address is safe, and you will never receive SPAM.

    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

     

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    A First-Hand Account of Quarantining Caribbean Island Style, 7 Ways to Find Free Money, and More! – Links

    A stone Path Bridge in Central Park covered in snow

    If you find yourself with some free time this holiday season, there’s no better way to spend it than looking for some “Sidewalk Money”. Meb Faber walks you through seven ways you might be able to find some serious coin. While not as lucrative, I’ve included an additional half dozen articles that should be worth your time. I won’t be back with more links until after Christmas, so if you’re celebrating…Merry Christmas!


    New Graduates

    7 Financial Tips for College Grads in 2020 – (PBF)

    It’s the time of year for newly-minted college graduates. If you have one in your life, they may be wondering where to begin financially. Here’s an article highlighting seven tips that will benefit all graduates.


    Retirement

    Instead of drinking a fourth glass of egg nog this holiday season, consider spending an hour or two searching for “Sidewalk Money” – (Meb Faber)

    Meb presents 7 ways to find “free money”. Most take 15 minutes or less. What have you got to lose? I’ll tell you what you’ve got to lose – nothing!

    The pandemic is another reason to expect an earlier “retirement” then planned – (Forbes)

    Putting together a comprehensive financial plan with a retirement plan of 65 sounds like a fantastic idea. But what happens when a pandemic, ageism, or health issues smack you in the face and retirement comes sooner than expected? When planning it’s always a good idea to move your expected retirement age forward a few years to account for unpleasant surprises. It also puts you in a position to accept a generous early retirement package if it comes along.

    Lessons learned from three years of retirement – (CanIRetireYet?)

    “You won’t do it in retirement if you’re not doing it now.”


    Travel

    Want to quarantine on a Caribbean island? – (CondeNastTraveler)

    Here’s how to do it in a resort on the island of Grenada, at a hotel which…refers to quarantining there as “vacationing in place.” A hotel room in paradise is a fantastic place to quarantine – until it isn’t. 

    Trips you may want to book a year in advance – (ThePointsGuy)

    Safaris, French Polynesia, a cruise to Antarctica…all vacations you should consider planning a year in advance. My guess is that bucket-list travel will be in high demand once it is safe to travel again. You might want to prepare in advance, just make sure everything is fully refundable.


    Podcasts

    Top podcasts of 2020 compiled by The Idea Farm– (Spotify)

    If you’ve got some holiday downtime and you enjoy listening to podcasts about markets, investing, and general business ideas – this is the list for you!


    Your questions about planning for retirement and travel answered. Where to go? What to do? How to plan it? How to afford it?

    You’ll not only be signed up for my newsletter, but you’ll also get a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for people who love to travel is all about. Thanks for reading!

     

     
     
  • *Privacy policy: your email address is safe, and you will never receive SPAM.

     

    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    It’s Time to Fortify Your Travel Budget, How to Reduce Your Taxes in Retirement, and Otherworldly Landscapes – Links

    A brick pathbridge over a calm stream

    I’m highlighting the fact that travel will explode in the coming years, and with it, prices are sure to follow. Prepare your travel budget now so you can enjoy a seamless transition from cocooning in your home to exploring the world. 


    Retirement

    Your Travel Budget Is About to Implode – Here’s What to Do About It – (PBF)

    How does your retirement budget look? It might not look as good as you think, given the bottled-up demand for travel that will be unleashed when the pandemic eases.

    Retirees – reduce the tax hit – (CNBC)

    The right strategy in retirement can significantly decrease the taxes you pay.


    Travel

    26 Otherworldly Landscapes to Visit – (Conde Nast Traveller)

    You might not be able to visit anytime soon, but one can dream.

    VRBO Trend Report 2021 – (VRBO)

    An informative report  – this is what families are thinking about for 2021 travel. Hint: 82% of families already have travel plans for 2021. Now that’s pent-up demand!

    Round the world in style – (Luxury Travel Advisor)

    5 continents, 28 countries, 72 destinations. This is exactly what I need to forget 2020.

    Did COVID change travel permanently? – (CNN)

    A vaccine may open up the flood gates to bucket-list travel. New technology and ways of thinking about travel may change the experience for a long time; some things will be better, others not.


    If you’d like to subscribe to my newsletter, you can do so below. You’ll also get a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for travelers looks like. Thanks for reading!

     

     
     
  • *Privacy policy: your email address is safe, and you will never receive SPAM.

     

    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    10 Amazing Retirement Locations, My Podcast Debut, and Living the Hallmark Christmas Movie Experience – Links

    Leaf covered path bridge

    My mind is definitely wandering toward travel if these links are any indication. I think it’s the knowledge that winter is upon us up north and I will be seeing way more of the inside of my home. This dread coupled with the promise of a vaccine before too long has me thinking about the next trip. What I’ve been reading:


    Retirement

    Find out where you measure up when it comes to 401k savings – (U.S. News & World Report)

    If you reach $1 million in your 401k by the time you retire, you’ll be ahead of the pack by many multiples. Start saving aggressively, and increase the amount every year. If you can meet the 401k max, you’ll be in good shape.

     

    The top 10 countries to retire in – (Business Insider)

    Have you ever dreamed about retiring overseas? It’s never too early to start scoping out potential locations.


    Investments

    I had the privilege of joining Kyle Hill, CFP®, on his podcast – Personal Finance from the Hill-Top. We talk about the basics of stocks, bonds, diversification, and more.


    Travel

    It’s going to be a long winter – embrace it! – (The Washington Post)

    “Friluftsliv…translates to open-air living and exemplifies the tradition of making time outdoors part of daily life — whatever the season.” Take it from the Norwegians, because they know how to do cold. When you get tired of the indoors this winter, make the outdoors your friend.

    19 hotels you’ll want to book just for the bathtub – (The Points Guy)

    I haven’t take a bath in 40 years. Yes, I said it! I’m solidly in the shower camp, but I could change my mind if I had these views.

    Towns to visit in Pennsylvania if you want to feel as if you’ve been dropped into a Hallmark Christmas Movie – (Travel Awaits)

    This might not be the best year for a Hallmark Christmas Movie experience, but save this link somewhere special, and when travel conditions improve, you’ll have a Christmas destination mapped out.


    If you’d like to subscribe to my newsletter, you can do so below. You’ll also get a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for travelers looks like. Thanks for reading!

     

     
     
  • *Privacy policy: your email address is safe, and you will never receive SPAM.

     

    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    How Much Do You Need to Retire (and Travel), What Makes You Happy in Retirement, and Soup – Links

    Path bridge through the woods with leaves turning colors

    Now that Halloween and Election Day have passed, is it too early to put up the Christmas tree? The old stand-by of waiting until Thanksgiving is over doesn’t seem to make sense in 2020. 

    The most common question I hear from people who reach out to my firm is – “How much do I need to retire?” I walk you through the process for do-it-yourselfers who want a quick answer. Also included below, the best of what I’ve been reading on retirement, travel, and, yes, soup. 


    Retirement

    How Much Do I Need to Retire (and Travel Like Royalty)? – (PBF)

    I walk you through a quick-and-dirty way of coming up with your number, using readily available online retirement calculators. If you’ve ever asked yourself – “How much do I need to retire?”, this is the article for you. If you enjoy traveling, I also discuss why it’s crucial to incorporate travel expenses into your budget before and after retirement.

    Over 55? Your retirement is more uncertain than ever before – (Forbes)

    It’s a warm and fuzzy feeling when you have a well-developed comprehensive financial plan. That is until your age 65 retirement suddenly, and without your consent, is forced upon you a decade early. Moral: always plan for retirement conservatively, erring on the side of an earlier than expected retirement. You may not have to retire at 55, but it’s nice to be prepared if it’s forced upon you.

    What makes you happy in retirement according to financial advisors? – (U.S. News & World Report)

    No earth-shattering surprises here, but a good reminder that it’s a mix of financial and social factors that will make you happy in retirement. If you ignore either side, your happiness will likely suffer.


    Travel

    Holiday Travel Report – (ThePointsGuy)

    Are you traveling for the holidays? Mix a little Mad Max with ER. Ok, it’s probably not going to be that bad, but I have to imagine stress will be elevated even more than usual, and everyone will be concerned about health.

    Financial Independence / Abbreviated Retirement – (New York Pilot)

    Think mini-retirement coupled with life-changing adventure. I believe we’re going to see a huge spike in this once the coronavirus is under control. We are all learning the valuable lesson of not waiting to do things you love. Do it now; you might not have a second chance.


    Soup

    26 soup ideas for the upcoming winter from around the world – (MSN)

    It’s that time of year! Are you ready to get your soup on! If you’re looking for ideas, here are 26 recipes to keep you warm.


    If you’d like to subscribe to my newsletter, you can do so below. You’ll also get a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for travelers looks like. Thanks for reading!

     

     
     
  • *Privacy policy: your email address is safe, and you will never receive SPAM.

     

    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    How Much Do I Need to Retire (and Travel Like Royalty)?

    A white castle rises out of the forest, clouds in a blue sky

    A Simple Retirement Calculator

    One of the most common questions in planning for retirement is: “How Much Do I Need to Retire?” And since I specialize in working with travelers, travel always comes up. The question may be, how do I travel like royalty, a rock star, or just, well?

    The answer is incredibly simple: “It depends.”

    You can start with a quick-and-dirty analysis that won’t take you more than fifteen minutes. NerdWallet.com has a solid, basic retirement calculator here, but the following concepts will work with any calculator you use.

    The initial inputs are straightforward: age, income, current savings, and the amount you save every month. The retirement calculator then illustrates how much you will have at retirement compared to how much you will need to retire. Simple, and not a bad start, but there are ways to refine your results further.

    On the NerdWallet calculator, click “Optional.” Additional inputs appear.

    The first input, “Monthly retirement spending,” is automatically set to use 70% of your pre-retirement income. A common rule-of-thumb is you’ll spend approximately 70-80% of your pre-retirement income once you retire. However, I have found this number can be low, especially when working with clients who expect to travel extensively. Consider bumping this number up to 90-100% if you’re doing a quick calculation. If you’d like to refine this number, put together a detailed budget for retirement, keeping in mind the significant changes that can occur when you tackle your bucket list and medical expenses grow.

    The next input is “Other expected income.” This includes Social Security, pensions, annuities, and other income sources you may have in retirement.

    The default age of retirement is set to 67. Change this to your desired retirement age. Also, have some fun with it. Increase your age, lower it, and see how it affects the numbers. Your final number should be conservative, perhaps a few years before you’d like to retire. This will build in some extra cushion to your projections. Many people retire earlier than they expected due to layoffs, early retirement packages, or health issues.

    Life expectancy is automatically set to 95, a reasonable number. However, maybe you have a family where everyone sails past 100 in excellent health. You can always make adjustments, and the bigger the number, the more conservative your estimates will be.

    The “Investment rate of return” default is 6% pre-retirement and 5% after retirement. These rates of return assume your portfolio will become more conservative post-retirement. These are reasonable estimates, but you can adjust the pre-retirement return, either up or down, to see how your results change. Just be realistic and don’t stray too far to the upside.

    How does it look? Are you on track? If you are, fantastic!

    You’re not quite done, however. Play with the numbers and create some worst-case scenarios. What happens if you have to spend dramatically more than you anticipated? How do you look if your investment returns are lower than expected? If you are still on track to retire, try nudging down your retirement age. You may not want to retire early, but it’s nice to know the option exists.

    More Detail

    The quick-and-dirty option above is acceptable for some. However, if your life is a little more complicated or you want to get more granular, consider the information below.

    Expenses

    Let’s refine the “Monthly retirement spending” part of this model.

    Put together a detailed list of your expenditures. There are hundreds of budget spreadsheets online. Find one that does a good job of breaking out spending into categories that will help you organize your expenses. If you’d like the spreadsheet that I use with my clients, please send me an email at david@pathbridgefinancial.com. Double-check your spreadsheet with bank statements. Does the spreadsheet expense total equal what is coming out of your bank accounts? If not, figure out why and adjust.

    Next, focus on retirement. Make a copy of your spreadsheet and start reducing or eliminating expenses that might change once you’re retired. What commuting expenses will go away? Will you continue to need a second car? Will your mortgage be paid off? Do you have life insurance policies that you will no longer need?

    Unfortunately, not all expenses will decrease. Health care costs will grow as you age. Projections vary greatly, but a 65-year-old couple should expect to spend approximately $11,000 a year on health care in retirement. Fidelity Investments has a health care cost calculator that will take you about three minutes to fill out.

    Now, the good stuff. In retirement, travel and leisure often increases in frequency and duration. Dream vacations to exotic locations, the purchase of an RV or boat, a summer in Tuscany, the lake-cabin you’ve always dreamed about – let your mind wander. How much would you like to spend on travel? Go into as much detail as possible.

    How you like to travel will affect your travel budget. Do you prefer 5-star luxury resorts on the other side of the world and dining at Michelin-star restaurants?

    A chef uses tweezers to complete a fine dining meal

    Or do you find most of your vacations are within driving distance of your home where you stay with friends, and you pride yourself on scouring farmers’ markets to prepare home-cooked meals? Odds are you’re somewhere in the middle, but dive into your travel deeply and try to put together a realistic travel budget.

    It’s easy to get caught up in dreaming about once-in-a-lifetime trips, but there’s something that most people find even more important – family. You’re likely to have much more leisure time in retirement, which usually results in more family time. How many trips are you going to take to visit your loved ones? Grandchildren especially can be an irresistible draw. Don’t forget to add these trips to your retirement travel budget.

    Don’t hold back when estimating expenses. We’re talking about traveling like royalty here! Err on the high side, and don’t be afraid to include some extravagant extras. It’s better to reach, and save some extra money, then underestimate and not have enough. You can always reduce some expenses or eliminate some of those extras when the time comes. A key concept when planning for travel in retirement – be flexible.

    Income

    If you’re going to adjust the “Other expected income” amount in the calculator, keep in mind that this will increase income every year between retirement and death – a limitation of this model.

    In reality, there are ways to increase income for a portion of retirement, including part-time employment or renting out a home, but these are unlikely to last your entire lifetime. There are also one-time income sources that might make a huge difference, such as selling a house or an inheritance. If you are running into too many one-offs, consider consulting a financial advisor who has software that can accommodate any non-standard inputs. I discuss this later in the article.

    The Answer

    By now, you should have a reasonable answer to your question: “How Much Do I Need to Retire (and Travel Like Royalty)?”

    You should have a good idea of how much you need and how your current situation looks in comparison. Are you coming up short? The best way to address this is to save more if you can. Even a few hundred dollars each month can be meaningful if you adjust course early.

    If saving more is impossible, nudge your retirement age higher. Working an extra year or two might be the solution to your shortfall. Spending less in retirement will stretch your nest egg as well. Remember, being flexible is key.

    However, don’t be tempted to increase the investment rate of return just to meet your retirement goals. It’s conservative for a reason, and you should keep it that way. A balanced portfolio of stocks and bonds isn’t going to return 15% a year over the long-run, just because the calculator allows the input.

    retirement travel illustrated by a tablet and statements

    If you’re unsure of what rate of return to use, Vanguard has a website that illustrates the average investment return for stock/bond portfolios over 90+ years. There are no guarantees that the future will deliver the same results, but it’s an excellent place to start. Remember, it makes sense to be conservative.

    You May Need a Financial Advisor

    There are many reasons you may decide to contact a financial advisor. The most important reason – your question: “How Much Do I Need to Retire (and Travel Like Royalty)?” was not answered adequately using online resources. Also, consider the following:

    • Would you prefer more detail in your retirement projections?
    • Does your situation involve a level of complexity that an online calculator cannot handle?
    • Would you feel more comfortable talking through your important retirement decisions?

    If you answered yes to any of these questions, you might want to talk with a financial advisor. Where do you start? I recommend reading this article from the CFP Board: “Ten Questions to Ask Your Financial Advisor.” Or, if you’d prefer a little humor with your advisor search, please take a look at my article: “How to Spot a Terrible Financial Advisor You Can’t Trust.”

    Now that you’re armed with what to look for in a financial advisor, I recommend the following directories:

    Find a CFP® Professional

    The National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA) Find an Advisor

    Summary

    The answer to the question, “How Much Do I Need to Retire (and Travel Like Royalty)?” is – it depends. It depends on your wants, needs, and resources. Whether you tackle this question with an online calculator or with a financial advisor, make sure you’re comfortable with the results and have a clear understanding of what it will take to achieve success.


    Enjoy what you just read? If so, you can subscribe to my newsletter below. You’ll also receive a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for travelers looks like. Thanks for reading!

     

     
     
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    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

     

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    A Haunted Hotel, How to Deal With an Unexpected Retirement, and 34 of the Best Travel Podcasts – Links

    The figure of death walks across a pathbridge

    The next week is going to be action-packed with Halloween and the election. Take some time this weekend, turn off the onslaught of political ads, and enjoy the first full moon in 76 years! Enjoy it while you can, because you’ll be waiting for nineteen years to see the next one. Happy Halloween!


    Retirement

    “Paying too much attention to politics can be harmful to your wealth.” – (Forbes)

    Elections can be stressful times, and the stock market has a history of volatility during times of perceived uncertainty. However, if you’re investing for the long haul, you have nothing to worry about.


    Unexpected Retirement – (Vanguard)

    Unfortunately, many people don’t work as long as they had planned – especially given today’s coronavirus-fueled layoffs. Vanguard has put together a solid list of steps to take if this happens to you.


    Early Retirement – Steps to Take – (Forbes)

    Planning is easier when it’s broken into two phases – pre and post-retirement.


    Travel

    Staying in a Haunted Hotel – The Terror and the Humor – (PBF)

    Happy Halloween! Ever stay in a haunted hotel all alone? This is my story.


    34 of the best travel podcasts – (Travel Massive)

    If you’re looking for a travel podcast, I got you covered!


    Would you fly if everyone on the plane is tested for COVID before takeoff? – (CNBC)

    A vaccine would be fantastic, but small things like rapid-results testing add up and might be just as important to getting life back to normal.


    If you’d like to subscribe to my newsletter, you can do so below. You’ll also get a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for travelers looks like. Thanks for reading!

     

     
     
  • *Privacy policy: your email address is safe, and you will never receive SPAM.

     

    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.