10 Amazing Retirement Locations, My Podcast Debut, and Living the Hallmark Christmas Movie Experience

Leaf covered path bridge

My mind is definitely wandering toward travel if these links are any indication. I think it’s the knowledge that winter is upon us up north and I will be seeing way more of the inside of my home. This dread coupled with the promise of a vaccine before too long has me thinking about the next trip. What I’ve been reading:


Retirement

Find out where you measure up when it comes to 401k savings – (U.S. News & World Report)

If you reach $1 million in your 401k by the time you retire, you’ll be ahead of the pack by many multiples. Start saving aggressively, and increase the amount every year. If you can meet the 401k max, you’ll be in good shape.

 

The top 10 countries to retire in – (Business Insider)

Have you ever dreamed about retiring overseas? It’s never too early to start scoping out potential locations.


Investments

I had the privilege of joining Kyle Hill, CFP®, on his podcast – Personal Finance from the Hill-Top. We talk about the basics of stocks, bonds, diversification, and more.


Travel

It’s going to be a long winter – embrace it! – (The Washington Post)

“Friluftsliv…translates to open-air living and exemplifies the tradition of making time outdoors part of daily life — whatever the season.” Take it from the Norwegians, because they know how to do cold. When you get tired of the indoors this winter, make the outdoors your friend.

19 hotels you’ll want to book just for the bathtub – (The Points Guy)

I haven’t take a bath in 40 years. Yes, I said it! I’m solidly in the shower camp, but I could change my mind if I had these views.

Towns to visit in Pennsylvania if you want to feel as if you’ve been dropped into a Hallmark Christmas Movie – (Travel Awaits)

This might not be the best year for a Hallmark Christmas Movie experience, but save this link somewhere special, and when travel conditions improve, you’ll have a Christmas destination mapped out.


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    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    How Much Do You Need to Retire (and Travel), What Makes You Happy in Retirement, and Soup – Links

    Path bridge through the woods with leaves turning colors

    Now that Halloween and Election Day have passed, is it too early to put up the Christmas tree? The old stand-by of waiting until Thanksgiving is over doesn’t seem to make sense in 2020. 

    The most common question I hear from people who reach out to my firm is – “How much do I need to retire?” I walk you through the process for do-it-yourselfers who want a quick answer. Also included below, the best of what I’ve been reading on retirement, travel, and, yes, soup. 


    Retirement

    How Much Do I Need to Retire (and Travel Like Royalty)? – (PBF)

    I walk you through a quick-and-dirty way of coming up with your number, using readily available online retirement calculators. If you’ve ever asked yourself – “How much do I need to retire?”, this is the article for you. If you enjoy traveling, I also discuss why it’s crucial to incorporate travel expenses into your budget before and after retirement.

    Over 55? Your retirement is more uncertain than ever before – (Forbes)

    It’s a warm and fuzzy feeling when you have a well-developed comprehensive financial plan. That is until your age 65 retirement suddenly, and without your consent, is forced upon you a decade early. Moral: always plan for retirement conservatively, erring on the side of an earlier than expected retirement. You may not have to retire at 55, but it’s nice to be prepared if it’s forced upon you.

    What makes you happy in retirement according to financial advisors? – (U.S. News & World Report)

    No earth-shattering surprises here, but a good reminder that it’s a mix of financial and social factors that will make you happy in retirement. If you ignore either side, your happiness will likely suffer.


    Travel

    Holiday Travel Report – (ThePointsGuy)

    Are you traveling for the holidays? Mix a little Mad Max with ER. Ok, it’s probably not going to be that bad, but I have to imagine stress will be elevated even more than usual, and everyone will be concerned about health.

    Financial Independence / Abbreviated Retirement – (New York Pilot)

    Think mini-retirement coupled with life-changing adventure. I believe we’re going to see a huge spike in this once the coronavirus is under control. We are all learning the valuable lesson of not waiting to do things you love. Do it now; you might not have a second chance.


    Soup

    26 soup ideas for the upcoming winter from around the world – (MSN)

    It’s that time of year! Are you ready to get your soup on! If you’re looking for ideas, here are 26 recipes to keep you warm.


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    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    How Much Do I Need to Retire (and Travel Like Royalty)?

    A white castle rises out of the forest, clouds in a blue sky

    A Simple Retirement Calculator

    One of the most common questions in planning for retirement is: “How Much Do I Need to Retire?” And since I specialize in working with travelers, travel always comes up. The question may be, how do I travel like royalty, a rock star, or just, well?

    The answer is incredibly simple: “It depends.”

    You can start with a quick-and-dirty analysis that won’t take you more than fifteen minutes. NerdWallet.com has a solid, basic retirement calculator here, but the following concepts will work with any calculator you use.

    The initial inputs are straightforward: age, income, current savings, and the amount you save every month. The retirement calculator then illustrates how much you will have at retirement compared to how much you will need to retire. Simple, and not a bad start, but there are ways to refine your results further.

    On the NerdWallet calculator, click “Optional.” Additional inputs appear.

    The first input, “Monthly retirement spending,” is automatically set to use 70% of your pre-retirement income. A common rule-of-thumb is you’ll spend approximately 70-80% of your pre-retirement income once you retire. However, I have found this number can be low, especially when working with clients who expect to travel extensively. Consider bumping this number up to 90-100% if you’re doing a quick calculation. If you’d like to refine this number, put together a detailed budget for retirement, keeping in mind the significant changes that can occur when you tackle your bucket list and medical expenses grow.

    The next input is “Other expected income.” This includes Social Security, pensions, annuities, and other income sources you may have in retirement.

    The default age of retirement is set to 67. Change this to your desired retirement age. Also, have some fun with it. Increase your age, lower it, and see how it affects the numbers. Your final number should be conservative, perhaps a few years before you’d like to retire. This will build in some extra cushion to your projections. Many people retire earlier than they expected due to layoffs, early retirement packages, or health issues.

    Life expectancy is automatically set to 95, a reasonable number. However, maybe you have a family where everyone sails past 100 in excellent health. You can always make adjustments, and the bigger the number, the more conservative your estimates will be.

    The “Investment rate of return” default is 6% pre-retirement and 5% after retirement. These rates of return assume your portfolio will become more conservative post-retirement. These are reasonable estimates, but you can adjust the pre-retirement return, either up or down, to see how your results change. Just be realistic and don’t stray too far to the upside.

    How does it look? Are you on track? If you are, fantastic!

    You’re not quite done, however. Play with the numbers and create some worst-case scenarios. What happens if you have to spend dramatically more than you anticipated? How do you look if your investment returns are lower than expected? If you are still on track to retire, try nudging down your retirement age. You may not want to retire early, but it’s nice to know the option exists.

    More Detail

    The quick-and-dirty option above is acceptable for some. However, if your life is a little more complicated or you want to get more granular, consider the information below.

    Expenses

    Let’s refine the “Monthly retirement spending” part of this model.

    Put together a detailed list of your expenditures. There are hundreds of budget spreadsheets online. Find one that does a good job of breaking out spending into categories that will help you organize your expenses. If you’d like the spreadsheet that I use with my clients, please send me an email at david@pathbridgefinancial.com. Double-check your spreadsheet with bank statements. Does the spreadsheet expense total equal what is coming out of your bank accounts? If not, figure out why and adjust.

    Next, focus on retirement. Make a copy of your spreadsheet and start reducing or eliminating expenses that might change once you’re retired. What commuting expenses will go away? Will you continue to need a second car? Will your mortgage be paid off? Do you have life insurance policies that you will no longer need?

    Unfortunately, not all expenses will decrease. Health care costs will grow as you age. Projections vary greatly, but a 65-year-old couple should expect to spend approximately $11,000 a year on health care in retirement. Fidelity Investments has a health care cost calculator that will take you about three minutes to fill out.

    Now, the good stuff. In retirement, travel and leisure often increases in frequency and duration. Dream vacations to exotic locations, the purchase of an RV or boat, a summer in Tuscany, the lake-cabin you’ve always dreamed about – let your mind wander. How much would you like to spend on travel? Go into as much detail as possible.

    How you like to travel will affect your travel budget. Do you prefer 5-star luxury resorts on the other side of the world and dining at Michelin-star restaurants?

    A chef uses tweezers to complete a fine dining meal

    Or do you find most of your vacations are within driving distance of your home where you stay with friends, and you pride yourself on scouring farmers’ markets to prepare home-cooked meals? Odds are you’re somewhere in the middle, but dive into your travel deeply and try to put together a realistic travel budget.

    It’s easy to get caught up in dreaming about once-in-a-lifetime trips, but there’s something that most people find even more important – family. You’re likely to have much more leisure time in retirement, which usually results in more family time. How many trips are you going to take to visit your loved ones? Grandchildren especially can be an irresistible draw. Don’t forget to add these trips to your retirement travel budget.

    Don’t hold back when estimating expenses. We’re talking about traveling like royalty here! Err on the high side, and don’t be afraid to include some extravagant extras. It’s better to reach, and save some extra money, then underestimate and not have enough. You can always reduce some expenses or eliminate some of those extras when the time comes. A key concept when planning for travel in retirement – be flexible.

    Income

    If you’re going to adjust the “Other expected income” amount in the calculator, keep in mind that this will increase income every year between retirement and death – a limitation of this model.

    In reality, there are ways to increase income for a portion of retirement, including part-time employment or renting out a home, but these are unlikely to last your entire lifetime. There are also one-time income sources that might make a huge difference, such as selling a house or an inheritance. If you are running into too many one-offs, consider consulting a financial advisor who has software that can accommodate any non-standard inputs. I discuss this later in the article.

    The Answer

    By now, you should have a reasonable answer to your question: “How Much Do I Need to Retire (and Travel Like Royalty)?”

    You should have a good idea of how much you need and how your current situation looks in comparison. Are you coming up short? The best way to address this is to save more if you can. Even a few hundred dollars each month can be meaningful if you adjust course early.

    If saving more is impossible, nudge your retirement age higher. Working an extra year or two might be the solution to your shortfall. Spending less in retirement will stretch your nest egg as well. Remember, being flexible is key.

    However, don’t be tempted to increase the investment rate of return just to meet your retirement goals. It’s conservative for a reason, and you should keep it that way. A balanced portfolio of stocks and bonds isn’t going to return 15% a year over the long-run, just because the calculator allows the input.

    retirement travel illustrated by a tablet and statements

    If you’re unsure of what rate of return to use, Vanguard has a website that illustrates the average investment return for stock/bond portfolios over 90+ years. There are no guarantees that the future will deliver the same results, but it’s an excellent place to start. Remember, it makes sense to be conservative.

    You May Need a Financial Advisor

    There are many reasons you may decide to contact a financial advisor. The most important reason – your question: “How Much Do I Need to Retire (and Travel Like Royalty)?” was not answered adequately using online resources. Also, consider the following:

    • Would you prefer more detail in your retirement projections?
    • Does your situation involve a level of complexity that an online calculator cannot handle?
    • Would you feel more comfortable talking through your important retirement decisions?

    If you answered yes to any of these questions, you might want to talk with a financial advisor. Where do you start? I recommend reading this article from the CFP Board: “Ten Questions to Ask Your Financial Advisor.” Or, if you’d prefer a little humor with your advisor search, please take a look at my article: “How to Spot a Terrible Financial Advisor You Can’t Trust.”

    Now that you’re armed with what to look for in a financial advisor, I recommend the following directories:

    Find a CFP® Professional

    The National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA) Find an Advisor

    Summary

    The answer to the question, “How Much Do I Need to Retire (and Travel Like Royalty)?” is – it depends. It depends on your wants, needs, and resources. Whether you tackle this question with an online calculator or with a financial advisor, make sure you’re comfortable with the results and have a clear understanding of what it will take to achieve success.


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    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

     

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    A Haunted Hotel, How to Deal With an Unexpected Retirement, and 34 of the Best Travel Podcasts – Links

    The figure of death walks across a pathbridge

    The next week is going to be action-packed with Halloween and the election. Take some time this weekend, turn off the onslaught of political ads, and enjoy the first full moon in 76 years! Enjoy it while you can, because you’ll be waiting for nineteen years to see the next one. Happy Halloween!


    Retirement

    “Paying too much attention to politics can be harmful to your wealth.” – (Forbes)

    Elections can be stressful times, and the stock market has a history of volatility during times of perceived uncertainty. However, if you’re investing for the long haul, you have nothing to worry about.


    Unexpected Retirement – (Vanguard)

    Unfortunately, many people don’t work as long as they had planned – especially given today’s coronavirus-fueled layoffs. Vanguard has put together a solid list of steps to take if this happens to you.


    Early Retirement – Steps to Take – (Forbes)

    Planning is easier when it’s broken into two phases – pre and post-retirement.


    Travel

    Staying in a Haunted Hotel – The Terror and the Humor – (PBF)

    Happy Halloween! Ever stay in a haunted hotel all alone? This is my story.


    34 of the best travel podcasts – (Travel Massive)

    If you’re looking for a travel podcast, I got you covered!


    Would you fly if everyone on the plane is tested for COVID before takeoff? – (CNBC)

    A vaccine would be fantastic, but small things like rapid-results testing add up and might be just as important to getting life back to normal.


    If you’d like to subscribe to my newsletter, you can do so below. You’ll also get a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for travelers looks like. Thanks for reading!

     

     
     
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    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    The Problem with Living on Social Security Alone, Longevity and Retirement Savings Disconnect, and Missing the Airport – Links

    A wooden bridge spans a small brook with colorful trees in the background

    I know you have other things on your mind right now, but don’t forget about retirement planning. If your only income is from social security, it’s going to be a lean ride.

    Are you missing the airport? Yeah, me too. There’s something about the energy, the potential, the anticipation of the next adventure.


    Retirement

    Can you live on social security alone? – (USA Today)

    Of course, it depends. But if you do, don’t expect much extravagance in your life. How you can supplement your retirement savings.


    The retirement savings disconnect – (Barrons)

    “Americans’ optimism about their longevity comes at a time when planning for retirement has become more complex.”

    Along with this longevity comes a healthier and more active retirement. Make sure your savings keep up with this new reality.


    Travel

    A lifelong traveler takes a journey inward – (The Washington Post)

    I hope that we will be able to travel, interact with, and witness the world again shortly. When we do, it will certainly seem strange. But when has travel not been strange?


    There’s a second wave of COVID-19, so be careful where you travel – (Chriselliotts.com)

    Use common sense and avoid crowds. The article contains some useful links if you’re researching a location. It’s going to be a long winter, folks.


    Missing the airport – (The Points Guy)

    I miss the buzz of an airport. I miss the mass of people in motion to see loved ones or going on vacation. I miss the anticipation of far-flung destinations. Now, if I could only get there without going through a metal detector.  


    If you’d like to subscribe to my newsletter, you can do so below. You’ll also get a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for travelers looks like. Thanks for reading!

     

     
     
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    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    The Vanlife, the Emergency Fund and Struggling to Save for Retirement – Links

    3 Arch Path bridge in Greece, surrounded by fall trees

    Retirement

    Your friend and mine – the emergency fund – (PBF)

    Why start an emergency fund? My article for the week.


    How to avoid RMD mistakes – (Yahoo Finance)

    You’ve finally made it to retirement, and you’re looking forward to spending the hard-earned money you’ve been collecting for decades. Leave it to the government to make it a royal pain in the butt – the complexity of RMDs.


    Americans are struggling to save enough for retirement – (Forbes)

    Only read this if you have a strong stomach. The synopsis – you need to take retirement planning and savings into your own hands as the traditional aids such as pensions are disappearing. I can’t emphasize enough to save aggressively from a young age because you are ultimately responsible for your retirement standard of living.


    Francisco Cervelli retires – (CBS Sports)

    Francisco Cervelli was more than a catcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates; he was a colorful character the fans loved. I have no doubt it was the same in New York, Atlanta, and Miami. Some of his best years were spent with the Buccos, and I was fortunate to see him play more than a few times. His energy was always high, and his love of the game was always apparent. You didn’t need to be a Pirates fan, or a fan of baseball at all, to be swept up in his enthusiasm and fun-loving spirit.

    Unfortunately, he battled concussions throughout his time in baseball, and his retirement announcement is at least partially the result of this struggle. Cervelli has decided to put his health before his career, and I applaud him.

    I keep thinking that the current pandemic will go away one day, and everything will return to near-normal. However, as time goes by, the further away from our old normal we get. One thing that we won’t see is the ever-smiling Francisco Cervelli playing baseball.

    Good luck, Francisco!


    Travel

    The #VanLife – (TDAmeritrade)

    Have you been dreaming of the vanlife in retirement?


    Travel contests – (theLuxuryTravelExpert)

    Who doesn’t love free stuff! Ok, I’m usually not one to start signing up for free things on the internet, but I think this pandemic is taking its toll. The majority of these are only for U.K. residents, but there are a few in there for everyone else. A couple of free nights in Rome and five all-inclusive nights in Antigua jumped out at me. Caveat – don’t blame me if you get overwhelmed with emails after entering one of these.


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    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    Why Start an Emergency Fund?

    A man with a crazy gray wig and red glasses yelling representing the life of the party

    There is nothing less sexy in personal finance than the emergency fund.

    Yes, I realize that contemplating death while diving into a life insurance policy is no fun either, but I’ll save that for another day. While the emergency fund may not be the overindulgent life of the party, it is definitely the dependable friend who will get you home and safely into bed.

    The hierarchy of savings is a popular topic in personal finance. Search for the phrase in Google, and you’ll see what I mean. I like to think of an emergency fund as the foundation of the saving’s pyramid. It should be the first place you save money. Yes, even before you jump on Robinhood to start trading options.

    Michael Kitces included a fantastic version of the pyramid you can find in his article – “The Hierarchy Of Tax-Preferenced Savings Vehicles For High-Income Earners.” It appears below.

    A colorful pyramid illustrating the hierarchy of savings

    How much should I save?

    The most common recommendation is to save enough to cover 3 to 6 months of expenses. Solid advice. But how do you know which number is right for you? Ask yourself the following questions.

    • How many sources of income does my family or I have?
    • How stable is my job?
    • How quickly would I be able to get another job?
    • Do I have substantial investments that are reasonably liquid outside of my emergency fund?
    • What percentage of my monthly spending is discretionary, and can it be cut in an emergency?

    It can be difficult to answer some of these questions accurately but err on the side of adding an extra month or two in savings if you’re in doubt.

    What makes an emergency fund so important?

    There’s no better way to derail your retirement plans than to pile on some high-interest debt because you lost your job. Your emergency fund is there to provide funds when life throws an unfortunate surprise at you. 

    A brown shoe about to step on a banana peel

    An emergency fund also gives you options. Panic over a lost job, a medical emergency, or a car accident can result in rushed, poor decision making. If you find yourself unemployed, would you rather calmly look for a new position that fits your career goals with a company you admire or grab the first job that comes along because you’re desperate for income?

    Do I have to worry about this? I make some serious coin!

    Given the importance of establishing an emergency fund, it’s sad to see only 28% of people in the U.S. have savings equal to six months of expenses, according to the Federal Reserve. And before you dismiss this as a problem for Generation Z, the same survey shows that only 39% of people over 55 have savings to cover six months. But high-income earners are rock-sold, no? Not really. Only 54% of earners in the top quartile could cover expenses for half a year using emergency savings.  

    What’s even worse? This survey was completed well before COVID-19. I’ll take a wild guess that savings levels are even lower now for many Americans.

    Even with a high income and substantial retirement savings, an emergency fund is a good idea. Retirement savings are great – for retirement. If you have to access retirement accounts in an emergency, there may be penalties, taxes, and fees. You will also miss out on the growth those investments would have delivered, potentially setting back your retirement goals.

    When should I access my emergency fund?

    Uh, in an emergency? True, but try to define what this means beforehand. An emergency should be a serious, unexpected financial event that must be addressed. Medical bills, car repair, a job loss are all reasons to tap your fund.

    A toy ambulance

    I work with travelers, and I know the pandemic lockdown has been difficult. You might believe that a trip to Paris after you’ve received a COVID-19 vaccine is an emergency of mental health. But, no, while possibly an emergency, it’s not a good reason to tap your fund.

    How to build it?

    Put your emergency savings into a separate account. Setting up an automatic withdrawal from either your paycheck or a checking account is the best way to fund it. I emphasize automatic, so it happens without effort on your part. It may take time to meet your emergency fund goal, but religiously making a deposit on a set schedule works well.

    Where should I put it?

    Liquidity is the key. Emergency money should be saved in a place that can be accessed quickly. A high-yield savings account or a money market account is ideal, and both are insured by the FDIC up to $250,000. Don’t get cute and reach for a higher yield by putting your emergency fund into an investment product that might lose value, is not insured, or is not readily available when you need it. Also, there are many financial institutions that are competing for your business, so look for accounts that will not charge you a fee of any kind. Bankrate is an excellent resource to find the best yielding money market accounts.

    How else will an emergency fund benefit me?

    An exciting part of having an emergency fund, yes, I said exciting, is it gives you financial flexibility. You can use this flexibility to save some serious money. How, you ask?

    Do you have a low deductible on your auto or home insurance? An emergency fund can allow you to raise the deductible and save money over the long term, assuming you’re not accident-prone.

    A common question asked by travelers – Do I need travel insurance during COVID? The answer may be no if you have a hefty emergency fund, and your only possible loss is financial, measurable, and manageable.

    If the possible loss can be strictly defined and equal to 10% of your emergency fund or less, I’d recommend passing on the insurance. On average, you will come out ahead financially in the long run. However, if you have a history of making claims, you have a habit of losing things, or you can’t sleep thinking about being uninsured, then buying travel insurance is a good idea.

    If you do need to access your emergency fund, replenish it as soon as you can. It won’t help you much if you drained it last year and forgot to fill it back up.

    Summary

    Fully funding a liquid account that is to be used only for emergencies is an essential first step in financial planning. The account can reduce stress, present you with options, and save you money. Unforeseen events will happen in your life, and it’s always better to be operating from a position of financial strength and security than having to scramble around to see which long-lost relative will float you a loan. Get this foundation of financial savings right, and you’ll be on your way to retirement glory.


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    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

     

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    Don’t Wait to Save for Retirement and Can You Have Too Much Travel Insurance? – Links

    Stone path leading to a castle

    Retirement

    Common retirement mistakes – (The Retirement Manifesto)

    The danger of waiting to save for retirement is clear as 48% of retirees retired earlier than expected. This can lead to some significant shortfalls in the retirement bucket, including the travel portion. The moral of this story is to save often and early.


    What to do if you’re near retirement and get laid off – (Forbes)

    All too many people are suffering through untimely layoffs during the pandemic. Here’s what to do if you take this opportunity to retire. The same moral as above applies.


    Travel

    Resource Guide for Travelers – (PBF)

    I put together a comprehensive resource guide for travelers trying to decide when to hit the road again. If you’re like me, you’ve been ready for months. 


    How do you know if you have too much travel insurance? – (Forbes)

    There are thousands of articles telling you to load up on travel insurance, but only a handful that will walk you through the process of determining if you have too much. It was great to have the chance to contribute to Christopher Elliott’s article.


    30 of the Best Nature Views in the World – (TheSuiteLife)

    There’s no better place for social distancing than nature. And while you’re out there, it’s nice to have an unforgettable view. Of course, “out there” in this instance appears to be some rather posh digs, but beggars can’t be choosers.


    Are you aching for a road trip? Every state’s restrictions on interstate travel – (ValuePenguin)

    If you are like me, you’re dreaming about fall road trips. Unfortunately, not everyone wants you to visit their state. Here are each state’s restrictions.


    If you’d like to subscribe to my newsletter, you can do so below. You’ll also get a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for travelers looks like. Thanks for reading!

     

     
     
  • *Privacy policy: your email address is safe, and you will never receive SPAM.

     

    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    How Not to Screw Up Your HSA or Social Security, and Dogs May Help Us Travel Again – Links

    A wooden pathbridge fords a creek green field

    Retirement

    Beware the Bucket List – (PBF)

    Most people mention travel as one of the main things they would like to do in retirement, yet 67% don’t budget for it. If you’re a traveler, this lack of planning can be devastating to either your retirement savings or your retirement travel dreams. 


    No one tells you this about taking social security early – (fedsmith)

    This is why you need a financial advisor! (Extreme bias here.)


    In your 50’s? Time to reassess your retirement plan – (CNBC)

    You’re running out of time to course-correct.


    Not investing HSA funds is a huge mistake – (USA Today)

    An HSA could be one of the best retirement accounts in your arsenal.


    Travel

    Coronavirus sniffing dogs – (AP News)

    A vaccine would be fantastic, but until then, steps like this will go a long way to getting us back to some sort of “normal” travel environment. I wonder if it would be possible to just walk around all day with one of these dogs?


    Travel wipes out ethnocentricity – (The Washington Post)

    I have been a huge fan of Rick Steves ever since my first trip to Europe. His guides are never afraid to offer an opinion – a good interview during the pandemic.


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    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.

    The Best Revenge is Traveling Well, Moving in Retirement and Travel Trends for Fall – Links

    A small Japanese Garden bridge with a lush green background

    Retirement

    Living an upscale lifestyle on a Social Security budget – (CNBC)

    Is COVID-19 making you want to retire, but your retirement savings are lacking? Retiring abroad is an option. A list of things to consider before making the move.


    The 5 Biggest Mistakes Made by Travelers Planning for Retirement – (PBF)

    There are plenty of landmines on the path to retirement, but these five are especially relevant to travelers. 


    Moving in retirement – housing decisions to consider – (CNBC)

    A thoughtful article about retirement and the critical decision-making process regarding where to live. Retirees discuss their experiences and share their conclusions. 


    Travel

    How boomers are dealing with Covid-19 and the loss of freedom – (nextavenue)

    This is exactly why you shouldn’t wait to travel and mark items off your bucket list.


    The best revenge is living traveling well – (The Points Guy)

    I think the Points Guy is spot on. 2021 could be a huge year for travel. I hope I’m lucky enough to take out my revenge on 2020 through a phenomenal trip for the ages.


    Travel trends for the fall – (Travel Pulse)

    There is no doubt – people are ready to travel. In fact, 59% of travelers are ready to jump on an international flight. I know! Seems high, but I’ll take their word for it. Trends for the rest of the year and 2021. 


    If you’d like to subscribe to my newsletter, you can do so below. You’ll also get a PDF that shows you exactly what a comprehensive retirement plan for travelers looks like. Thanks for reading!

     

     
     
  • *Privacy policy: your email address is safe, and you will never receive SPAM.

     

    Financial Advisor David Tuzzolino

    David Tuzzolino, CFA, CFP®, is the Founder and CEO of PathBridge Financial, a firm that specializes in providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management services for clients that are nearing retirement and love to travel.